Infusion Care Made Smart, Simple, Safe

The MedLite ID Smart-Lite system,  in 60 seconds illuminate the primary medication IV line and prevent life-threatening infusion Adverse Drug Events.

Our Aim

To Make Infusion Adverse Drug Events and Avoidable COVID-19 Exposure "Never-Events"  

No video selected

Select a video type in the sidebar.

Infusion Adverse Drug Events

Is 9 out of 10 an acceptable error rate for patient care? With up to 90% of all IV infusions containing at least one error, and infusion Adverse Drug Events representing 56% of all that occurs, we decided to make a smart-lite safety solution that changes care in 60 seconds.
Learn More

COVID 19 Exposure Reduction

Can we afford to lose any more front-line nursing heroes? 15 minutes of Covid exposure is considered prolonged by the CDC, quarantine is 10-20 days if you test positive. With a 19% nursing attrition rate in 2021, our smart-lite safety solution can eliminate 2 hours of C19 exposure per shift.
Learn More

MedLite ID Clinical Evidence

How big a change can MedLite make for nurses, patients, and acute hospitals? 83% of nurses trying the MedLite solution want to adopt it and patient safety was increased by 78%. Ninety seconds to learn, sixy seconds to use, the next patient life changed.
Learn More

90 Seconds to Learn — 60 Seconds to Use

1 Patient Life Changed

With an average of eight IV lines per patient in the ICU, IVs are designed to deliver medications of all types, yet only one line, the “Safe Line”, flowing saline,  can be used to infuse a life-saving medicine with the certainty of not creating a drug interaction error, an infusion ADE (Adverse Drug Event), as the others are dedicated to specific drugs. It raises this question: if a patient has 4-20 lines in their body, how will a medical professional know the right line to use when a “code blue” is ringing out, in a dark room, and when patient care is stretched beyond its limits in a COVID-19 positive world? 

This tangled mess of IV lines is called “infusion confusion” by those working on the front lines, and, unfortunately, mistakes are made.  The size of the issue is alarming: 56% of all ADEs are infusion-related, the effect of caregivers choosing the wrong infusion line. In a time of COVID-19 care, with more patients and fewer nurses, “line tracing,” as it is called, needs to be fast and effective. With 60-90% of all IV infusions in the United States containing one or more errors that can cause accidental deaths, hospitals are paying on average, per every 100 beds in the hospital, $2,200 per day in avoidable ADE costs. That does not count the upwards of $5 million in estimated wrongful-death legal costs should such an error occur and the average settled cost of an ADE being $240K+.

Investing in safer and higher quality of care for both patients and caregivers by making it simpler to choose the right line and reduce COVID-19 exposure could save lives and bring down these costs. This is the mission of MedLite ID, which has created technology that will “Lite the Way," illuminating the main infusion line and reducing the potential for “infusion confusion.

Problem-Image-MedLite-Product-v2

Quotes-ImageEspecially in today’s COVID world, where we routinely keep the pumps outside the room with 15 feet of connected tubing going to a triple lumen catheter, there may be easily 6-8 powerful meds (vasoactive drips and sedatives) that an IV push medication given in the wrong line could be fatal. Clearly identifying the “carrier” would be made so easy with the clip-on line device. You try tracing 8 all-look-alike lines and trace it all the way to the patient’s port and see how easy it is."

US Acute Hospital Nurse

A Better Tomorrow

Drive ADE Risk and Avoidable COVID-19 Exposure to Zero

GSA-Logo-3
ISO-Logo-2
Premier-Logo-2
WSI-Logo-2
U.S-DVA-lOGO-2
ASILogo trans
Pri-Logo-2
Testimonials

What MedLite Nurses Say

It would be beneficial for night nurses that are needing to push meds through the maintenance line to help identify without having to turn any lights on, because they can verify the line before the MedLites go out.  Then they know they are using the correct line on patients with multiple lines.  Can be used in more scenarios than just emergent/rapid ones.

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner
Intermountain Healthcare

I would use MedLite ID, when there are multiple lines on the patient and in a situation where there are rapid response events or codes being called needing immediate medications pushed.

 

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner

I liked that I could use it to identify the line I needed from the other side of the bed and had quicker access that way. Quicker access and detection of line in an emergent situation. When you have a lot of different meds running on a patient, it made it so easy to identify.

 

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner

I was able to trace line much easier because of Med Lite ID

 

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner

I could see it being helpful in the ICU or other areas where patients have multiple IV pumps and lines.

 

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner

It would more quickly identify an unlabeled line as so many meds can't go together or mix together. Having that knowledge would prevent you from delaying care by immediately knowing which line is which.

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner

It really does have potential in the ICU, if your patient is crashing, or during a resuscitation.

 

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner

When there are multiple lines on the patient and in a situation where there are rapids or codes being called needing immediate medications pushed.

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner

Medlite made it easier to find the maintenance fluid when multiple lines running.

 

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner

it would be helpful in a high stress situation to double check the right line.

 

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner

I think it would be benefit the ICU where they have lots of lines running, but in general I feel like it would be a benefit to any pt that had more than 2 lines running at the same time.

 

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner

This is very beneficial to patients with multiple lines, I am currently spendinging lots of time tracing multiple lines and this would eliminate it.

 

Icon-Nurse-Icon
Nurse Practioner
Light-Line-Separetor-2
Header-homepage

Dusty-Graphic-400x400

Dusty's Story - Triumph Over Tragedy

 

In 2008, our sixteen-year-old son, Dusty, was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia, requiring a bone-marrow transplant. Dusty underwent chemotherapy during the four-month wait for a donor and frequently found his way to the pediatric intensive care unit. Infusion confusion was a consistent problem in the ICU and during his normal hospital stays. Speaking with clinicians, it became obvious that seeking out the primary IV line was a common and reoccurring frustration.

 

Four months after Dusty started his chemotherapy, a donor was secured. We transported our son to Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah for the procedure. During his five-month stay at Primary Children’s Hospital, the IV lines seemed to multiply. On any average day, Dusty would have five IV lines attached to his port and various veins, and as many as 11 different infusion lines. The stress experienced and time clinicians spent to locate the primary infusion line was astonishing. I thought time and time again, there must be a better way to identify the proper line.


Sadly, Dusty passed away in January of 2009, at the age of seventeen. My wife and I are forever thankful to those healthcare providers at Primary Children’s Hospital for their kind, patient, and skillful care. MedLite ID came to light after years of experimentation with infusion confusion and in honor of our son, Dusty. Today, every MedLite ID product includes a dedication to Dusty’s memory.

                                                                                                                         Dusty's Father, MedLite ID Inventor, and CoFounder - Dr. Wayne Provost

 

Newsletter

Light-Line-Separetor-White

MedLite ID News

Breaking Down Tangled IV Lines: "Infusion Confusion"

In the ICU, many patients receive multiple infusions at a time. This makes it difficult to differentiate each line, as healthcare professionals must identify and follow the tubing, pump, and access port to make an infusion change​​.

Learn More >>

The Second Victim: ADEs & Their Impact

WHO IS THE SECOND VICTIM?

Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) can result in traumatizing experiences. Patients are often left victimized after an unanticipated medical error or injury … However, there is a second victim we often overlook — the medical provider involved.

 

Learn More >>

MedLite ID: An Innovation Reducing Infusion Confusion

While America’s healthcare system is no stranger to criticism and you likely already know about its need for reform, you may be surprised to learn where the spotlight is shining: on the IV lines hooked up to patients in ICUs, operating rooms,  and COVID-19 units.

Learn More >>